Tag Archives: Recipe

Orioles vs. Twins @ Camden Yards Tonight

Tonight is the first Tuesday bargain night of the season, so we’re going to be watching tonight’s game as God intended- in the stands with the die hards. Now that the ball club sucks again, we happily predict that the fairweather types and the school aged kids will be staying home.

A trip to the Yard is always a good time, but honestly, we’ve had more fun watching this last road trip from the upper deck. That is to say… the upper deck of our house. The Chophouse features two decks off the back of it, with an exterior door and a window in the rear bedroom. We couldn’t say what’s taken us so long, but we’ve recently discovered that we can easily move our little office flatscreen to the desk and face it out the window, enabling us to sit on the deck and watch the game in the warm weather with our feet up on the windowsill. Land of Pleasant Living indeed!

And while we’re out there, we’ve been indulging in our favorite summertime old-man drinking snack: pickled eggs.

Pickled eggs... the Chop's favorite baseball snack.

Time was, pickled eggs were as popular a drinking snack as wings and fries are today. No tavern was complete without an egg jar, and pickled eggs were thought to complement beer as well as pretzels or peanuts. Times have changed, and beer has changed (much for the better), but when the weather gets hot and we’re looking toward a light, simple lager or pilsner, we’re also looking toward the egg jar.

When most people think of pickled eggs, they immediately imagine purple ones with a ton of beets thrown in. In fact, there are dozens upon dozens of different recipes to use for pickling eggs. Here’s the one that we favor at home:

The Chop’s Pickled Egg Recipe

  • 12 boiled eggs, peeled
  • 1 1/2 cups apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tbls minced garlic
  • 1 tbls salt
  • 1 tsp seasoned salt
  • 1 tsp dried onion or onion powder
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • Combine everything except the eggs and stir well. Heat brine if desired. Place the eggs in a jar with a tight sealing lid and pour the brine over them. Wait 4-5 days.

    You may be scratching your head or turning up your nose now, but bookmark this post anyway. A week from now when you’ve got a few dozen leftover Easter eggs cluttering up your fridge, it just might come in handy.

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    Filed under Orioles Baseball

    The Chop’s Père Noël Cocktail Recipe

    We would have liked to get this up before Christmas, when we were talking last week about ’tis the season for amaretto, but Christmas will sneak up on you quickly… like the Krampus. Anyway, this is the time of year when you seem to see bottles of amaretto floating around everywhere. Since taking that stuff straight is about as enjoyable as drinking maple syrup, you’ve got to know how to mix it if you don’t want that bottle to collect dust and become something of an annual holiday joke.

    An obvious choice in dealing with amaretto is cranberry juice, which is very seasonal this time of year and which has the tartness to offset the overly sweet taste of amaretto. Although the folks at DiSaronno and their vaguely ethnic, very homosexual spokesman would have you think differently, cranberry alone is not a suitable mixer for amaretto. Mixing two things that are gross will never make something that is good. It’s going to take a little more mixing to come up with something drinkable. We did a little more mixing, and the result was the Père Noël cocktail.

    If it comes out red, it's got too much cranberry in it.

    The Chop’s Père Noël Recipe

    • 3 parts bourbon
    • 2 parts amaretto
    • 2 dashes Angostura bitters
    • 4 parts cranberry juice

    Pour ingredients in that order into a double old-fashioned or highball glass full of ice. Stir once or twice and sip.

    It’s important not to use too much juice in this. It’s a cocktail and not a highball or juice mixer. When you get it right, it should taste surprisingly similar to the inside part of a chocolate-covered cherry. (Cherry cordials are one of the Chop’s favorite things about Christmas, by the way.) That said, this drink goes really, really well with dark chocolate, so if you’ve got some lying around after the holidays, mixing up one of these is a great way to complement it after dinner, or if you’re in a diet, instead of dinner.

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    Photo and more on amaretto at Liquor Snob.

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    Filed under Cocktails

    Holiday Fare: The Chop’s Roasted Kale Greens Recipe

    This is about as far as you can get from a food blog, but December is a pretty slow month for public events, and you can only post so many cocktail recipes before the whole city starts to think you’re kind of a drunk.

    We’re heading up to Mom and Pop Chop’s house for our annual Christmas Eve party and they’ve requested we bring a vegetable side dish. Much as we cringe at the idea of being a food blogger, we do believe that eating well is integral to living well. We do some pretty damn good cooking here at the Chophouse, even if it doesn’t show up in the blog. So just this once, just to prove that we can, we’ll show you what we’re bringing along tonight.

    2011 Will be the year of the kale. You heard it here first.

    Roasted Kale Greens

    • A bunch of kale.
    • An onion
    • A red bell pepper
    • 3 oz. Olive Oil
    • 1 oz. Champagne vinegar
    • 1 oz sugar
    • 1/2 oz. water
    • 1 tsp. each salt and pepper

    First of all, all those measurements are guesses. So are the cooking times. Another reason we’re not too keen on writing recipes is because we like to play it by ear in the kitchen, cook on the fly and all of that. Anyway, cut the pepper in half and 86 the seeds. Slice it and the onion. Coat them both in olive oil and roast them at 450° until they look nice and roasty.

    In the meantime chop the kale into pieces, getting rid of most of the stems and coat in evenly in a mixing bowl with olive oil. In another bowl mix up your vinegar, sugar, water, salt and pepper. Once the onion and pepper are roasted mix them in with the kale and move it all into baking dish. Lace it lightly with that seasoned vinegar and roast the whole mess at 400° until the edges of the leaves start to blacken, shouldn’t be too much more than about 10 minutes.

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    Filed under A Day in the Life of the Chop

    The Chop’s Chatreuse Gimlet Cocktail Recipe

    So we find ourselves in the thick of Memorial Day Weekend, and those of you that aren’t at the beach are probably spending today at some sort of cookout, potluck, garden party or other social event. In the spirit of the season, we’d like to humbly suggest you forgo the cheapie bottle of Australian Sauvignon Blanc and instead swing by Hopkins Deli for a more potent and memorable hostess gift; a bottle of Chartreuse.

    As you already know, the Chop loves a classic cocktail. Unfortunately, we’re not big on gin, and very picky about rum (and not snobby picky… we like Bacardi). So when spring and summer roll around and it’s time to lighten up with the brown liquor, we find ourselves drinking too many things that taste like lemons and limes.

    How can we add a little more flavor and still keep the vodka gimlet a crisp, refreshing, warm weather drink? The answer was simpler than we thought.

    The Chartreuse gimlet will look similar to a traditional gimlet or daquiri.

    This one’s another Baltimore Chop original as near as we can tell, and it took us a lot more tweaking than we thought it would. We’ve got a sweet tooth, so we started out by adding simple syrup, which was a mistake. The Chartreuse and citrus are sweet enough as-is, and you may even want to add a dash of bitters if it suits your taste.

    Matters were also complicated by the fact that not all bars carry Chartreuse, although they probably should. A special hat tip is in order to Bad Decisions who not only carries green and yellow Chartreuse, but has a citrus press juicer behind the bar.

    The Charteuse Gimlet

    1 part Stolichnaya vodka

    1 part Yellow Chartreuse

    Juice of half a lime

    It’s as simple as that. Shake, strain, and enjoy. Its got all the complexity of flavor you’d want in a gin gimlet, without the bitter, medicinal juniper taste of gin. As we said, you might like to add bitters, and if you do, we recommend Fee Brothers’ Grapefruit Bitters which will add a new note of complexity to the drink, without altering the flavor drastically. You can also try the green variety of Chartreuse, although in our experience the yellow is much more enjoyable in this cocktail.

    A new twist to an old classic, a pitcher of these at today’s function will insure that everyone has a great weekend, and that no one actually remembers it.

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    Filed under Cocktails